Antje Duvekot, Michael McDermott – Tickets – The Evening Muse – Charlotte, NC – January 18th, 2013

Antje Duvekot, Michael McDermott

Antje Duvekot

Michael McDermott

Fri, January 18, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Evening Muse

Charlotte, NC

$12.00

Antje Duvekot
Antje Duvekot
New Siberia is a special album to me because the songs are wiser," says songwriter Antje Duvekot. "They have
an age to them that should resonate with anyone who's struggled through a difficult period and come out better.
There's something really sweet in being able to look back on a journey like that, from a darker, younger self to a
better, older place."

That might not seem like a startling statement from most songwriters. But Duvekot is not most songwriters. For
years, her songs have been critically praised for their hard-won wisdom, dark-eyed realism, and street-smart romanticism.
Fans will certainly find all of that in New Siberia. But coursing up from beneath the dark, like flowers pushing through stone, is a mature sense of hope, growth, renewal, and love. She sees past the ghosts of a receding past to forge new trails of self exploration, judging her journey not only by what's facing her, but by how far she's already traveled.

Blending uncommonly beautiful vocals with one of the sharpest poetic sensibilities in her field, Duvekot has a remarkable ability to make us believe she is whispering secrets in our ear, and we know that she believes every word she sings. New Siberia is her third studio album -- and a masterpiece of the modern folk genre. She assembled it herself with a fresh confidence enhanced by the fan loyalty displayed on Kickstarter.com. Again produced
by folk legend Richard Shindell, the cinematic ensemble sound showcases Duvekot's bold, sure-footed path through emotional terrain most artists dare not even enter. "Musically, I think I am in the strongest place I've ever been," says Duvekot.

"This album is even more personal than the last one, which was pretty personal,'' she adds, alluding to The Near Demise of the High Wire Dancer, voted top album of 2009 by lauded folk station WUMB 91.9 FM in Boston. The new record seeps further into the heart. She says "it includes a song about my mother that took me 20 years to write ('Phoenix'), a song about my dreams of making music becoming shattered ('The Life of a Princess'), and a
song about not fitting into high school('Glamorous Girls').''

The theme is a triumph over a difficult past. After being separated from her brother and father at age 13, Antje found herself uprooted from her native Heidelberg, Germany, to Delaware, where her home further fractured, as she struggled to assimilate, lacking English language skills or the familiar cultural sign posts from her youth. But she is more optimistic today, having found love and become an esteemed headliner in the U.S. and overseas as more people discover the power of her intimate music. "What a blessing to have worked with someone as talented as Antje,'' says Shindell, her producer. "With a voice like hers and songs as good as these, a producer just tries to get out of the way, do no harm, and let the artist speak for herself.''

Shindell played acoustic guitar and gathered a top-notch band to record at NRS Studios near Woodstock. Band members include drummer Ben Wittman (Paul Simon, Paula Cole, Jonatha Brooke and Rosanne Cash), electric guitarist Marc Shulman (Suzanne Vega, Jewel, Chris Botti), and bassist Lincoln Schleifer (Levon helm, Rosanne Cash, Greg Trooper). Folk star John Gorka contributed backup vocals and guest cameos came from mandolinist Mark Erelli and world-class cellist Jane Scarpantoni.
The title "New Siberia'' is a metaphor for where Antje is headed. Having sprung from a cold, inhospitable place, she has moved on but also retained the past that shaped her. "The pain is built-in, but a lot of these songs are life-affirming. I have managed to save myself while staying honest about where I came from,'' she says. A stunning video captures the essence of the title track. Director Asia Kepka took Antje to a beach in Rockport, MA and
created a fantasy sequence. Antje has never looked more mysterious, nor more determined. The most haunting
track is "Phoenix,'' in which Antje cathartically addresses her mother: "I rose up like a phoenix, rose up from your
ash/ You just turned your back and I'll never understand.'' But there are also welcome moments of comic relief, as
on "The Perfect Date'' (about an awkward first date that still suggests true love in the making) and the satirical
"Glamorous Girls.'' There's also an imaginative interpretation of Amelia Earhart's little-known co-pilot, Fred
Noonan, and his possible feelings for her ("the Ballad of Fred Noonan").

No one writes quite like Antje, who was influenced lyrically by the very greats -- Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon
and Leonard Cohen, who are Mt. Rushmore-like figures to her. "Antje is the rare artist who can write about the
social and the personal in the same breath,'' says folk icon Ellis Paul. "Her voice has a sound of innocence and
naivete which makes razor-sharp insights into the human condition.'' Adds producer Neil Dorfsman, who has
worked with Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and Sting: "She creates an entire, detailed world in verse, and takes you
there with beautiful and understated melody. Her songs are stunning paintings of color and shade.'' And as
Springsteen biographer Dave Marsh says, "Antje is the whole package.''

Antje's path has taken many twists and turns, from Germany to the University of Delaware, then to a short stint in
New York City and Vermont, followed by her current residence in Boston. She is often also on the road, stopping
at the prestigious Newport Folk and Philadelphia Folk Festivals, the classic radio show "Mountain Stage'' and
overseas at the Celtic Connections Festival in Scotland and the Tonder Festival in Denmark. She has won the
John Lennon Songwriting Competition and the best new folk award at the Kerrville Festival as well as the Boston
Music award for "outstanding folk artist".
Her first album, Big Dream Boulevard, was produced by Seamus Egan of Irish-American supergroup Solas. Her
second, The Near Demise of the High Wire Dancer, was produced by Shindell. And now there's New Siberia. As
she says, "I've grown and come to a stronger period in my life. I can look back with more optimism than before.
I've really come far. I think you can only look back when you're in a stronger place.''
Michael McDermott
Michael McDermott
Michael McDermott’s story is the classic tale of survival, perseverance, love and redemption. The first half begins with youthful innocence, a dream-come-true recording contract, a classic debut album heralded by the media, and a downward spiral with seemingly no bottom. The second half begins with love and the woman that would become his wife, Heather Horton, their baby girl, and a collection of achingly honest songs born of new inspiration that are amongst the very best of his ten album career.

The chapters in between innocence lost and love-fueled redemption are about McDermott’s survival as he tears down the walls between himself and his audience to cultivate an intimate and faithful connection that has kept him going through the years. On stage, he pours every ounce of himself into the songs and delivers a sermon of a show that in his own words “is as much for the outcast as it is the congregation.” It is more often than not a cathartic audience experience as McDermott leads them through the explorations of the dark corners of life’s journey, while uncovering the middle class truths of their own lives.

McDermott got off to a fast start when he released his first album 620 W. Surf. The music media heralded him with comparisons to rock n’ roll’s godlike, “The new Springsteen...Truly singular lyrics...Like Dylan...One of his generation’s greatest talents,” they wrote. Pretty heady stuff for a 20-year old kid of Irish descent who’d barely traveled further from his Southside Chicago neighborhood than Wrigley Field.

The music business pays attention when your introduction to the world is accompanied by the names Azoff and Koppelman. As a young A&R man, Brian Koppelman heard the buzz that was coming out of the Chicago coffeehouse scene where McDermott was making the rounds. He swooped in and signed him to Giant Records, the label that Warner Music had just bankrolled for already legendary impresario Irving Azoff.

MTV, Rolling Stone, the New York Times, chart topping radio airplay, besieging label promotion. It was all there. A new artist could not dream for anything more. Even author Stephen King, well known for his affinity to quote rock lyrics in his mega-selling novels, wrote, "Not since I first heard Bruce Springsteen singing 'Rosalita' had I heard someone who excited me so much as a listener, who turned my dials so high, who just made me feel so (expletive) happy to have ears.”

And then, as fast as it started, came the skidding halt. "By the time I was 24, I was over," the singer-songwriter says. "Really, I was kind of over." Maybe it was the hype, or the timing was wrong. Who knows? The music biz is full of stories of songwriting singers with next-coming honors that end with broken dreams. Sometimes it just doesn’t work. McDermott acknowledges that he had something, perhaps a lot, to do with it. He was young, naïve, free spirited and believed the hype. With no idea how to reconcile his future path with his sudden dream-come-true life, and no one he trusted enough to guide him, he responded by going off the rails, living the rock n’ roll fantasy of drugs, alcohol, fast lane parties, strippers, mobsters, jail...you name it, he did it. He went out of control and scared the hell out of the people close to him.

Michael slipped so far down that Brian Koppelman, who went on to become a Hollywood screenwriter, admits that his first film, the 1998 poker cult-classic Rounders, carried a lot of his experiences with McDermott within its narrative. Matt Damon’s gambling protagonist actually shared the songwriter’s stage name (they call him “Mike” in the movie), while Edward Norton’s character, an out-of-luck ex-con with big debts to pay, carried the surname Murphy, McDermott’s actual birthright. Though they gave their hero his name, Koppelman and screenwriting partner David Levien both admitted that McDermott aligned more with the Murphy character, a notorious screw-up who just can’t seem to catch a break.

Between his own self-destruction and the recording industry shakeup that marked the mid-1990s, McDermott found himself without a contract and awash in debt and self-doubt. “Throughout the years, I had continued to feel like I was on a mission, of sorts, singing spiritual songs,” he once said, “but never really feeling good about the other elements of my life.”

Understandably, he's found positive inspiration in his wife and daughter and having at last become more comfortable in his own skin, scarred but smarter, McDermott is making more life-affirming choices. It’s reflected in his last two self released albums, Hit Me Back and Hey La Hey, which include some of the strongest and most profound songs that he has written.

In 2013, McDermott and Horton introduced a new band, The Westies, another slice of McDermott’s pie. More folk than rock, The Westies are a rootsy Americana band complete with steel guitar, mandolin, fiddle, and stand-up bass. It’s classic McDermott, but this time through the eyes and soul of his faux-famous alter ego, Johnny Darkstar.

There’s another quote by Stephen King that suits Michael himself as well as the intended reference to his talents: “Michael’s music, like Springsteen's and Van Morrison's, helped me to find a part of myself that wasn't lost, as I had feared, but only misplaced. That's why we love the ones who are really good at it, I think: because they give us back ourselves, all dusted and shined up, and they do it with a smile...Michael McDermott is one of the best songwriters in the world and possibly the greatest undiscovered rock ‘n’ roll talent of the last 20 years.”

Although fame has eluded Michael, he has the rest of the act nailed, and twenty years in to his career he isn’t lost or misplaced, he has found himself, has no fear, he’s still good at it, and is all dusted and shined up and ready for the twenty years to come.
Venue Information:
The Evening Muse
3227 N. Davidson St.
Charlotte, NC
http://www.eveningmuse.com/