The Big Lonesome, Future Lives, The High Beams – Tickets – The Evening Muse – Charlotte, NC – July 15th, 2017

The Big Lonesome, Future Lives, The High Beams

Evening Muse proudly presents...

The Big Lonesome

Future Lives

The High Beams

Sat, July 15, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

The Evening Muse

Charlotte, NC

$8.00 - $10.00

The Big Lonesome
The Big Lonesome
The Big Lonesome is an indie rock band from Boston, MA. Formed in 2009 after songwriter Chad Gosselin released a collection of home recordings, he recruited his
brother Luke Gosselin (guitar/lap steel/vocals) and friend Joe Ziemba (bassist) to play coffee shops, living rooms, and dilapitating rock clubs around the northeast. In 2012, they were joined by drummer Andy Korajczyk. The band quickly developed their sound into a four piece tapestry of shoegazed indie rock with a sensibility for pop. 2016 saw the departure of Ziemba and the addition of Sam Okon. Their music has been described as sounding like "The Rolling Stones covering Sonic Youth" and has drawn comparisons to Guided by Voices and early Wilco.

In 2014, the Lonesome released its first formal EP Undone along with producer Sean McLaughlin (Matchbox 20/Elliott Smith), and mastering engineer Jeff Lipton (Wilco/Spoon/Bon Iver). The band toured the northeast and east coast the following summer in support of the record, garnering national radio attention along the way.

The Big Lonesome are currently working on their sophomore effort which is set for an early 2017 release date.
Future Lives
Future Lives
King of Prussia songwriter Brandon Taj Hanick wasn’t planning to stop. He had been living out of a suitcase, traveling around the U.S. & Europe for 9 months ­­ wandering; visiting old haunts with old friends in his old towns; recording and then touring in support of the band’s critically acclaimed 2014 double album Zonian Girls...And The Echoes that Surround Us All (Minty Fresh Records); making a mobile album and producing the guerrilla­style, award­winning music road trip documentary Poster Boys or: The Art of Mobile Recording. To pay the bills, Hanick worked writing ACT Test questions remotely and peddling Animal House & Audrey Hepburn posters to dorm­dwelling students. But then he stopped ­­ in the South, of all places. She said, “Come on back to Georgia, and I’ll be here!” And he had to go. And he had to stay. And now they’re reveling in the early years of marriage together in Athens, where it all began for pysch poppers King of Prussia “all those years ago.”
The Athenians are a little older, more responsible, maybe; the door guy became the bartender, the bartender became the owner. Like Athens, the “highly literate” songwriting that Hanick has become known for has also aged like a fine, young cannibal, calling to mind the narrative, visual lyrics of Young, Cohen and Merritt. Future Lives’ Mansions sounds like Athens ­­ the autumnal twang of Buffalo Springfield steeped in a psychedelic Elephant 6 summer.
Mansions doesn’t take time for granted. It’s the warm excitement of a new, deep love. “The Knowing.” Seeing the world and watching fire fill city squares. Exploring the space/time continuum at a street fair in a dream. Dealing with death, because it’s inevitable. And it’s the end. But it’s not. But it is. There are spirited elements throughout the songs, which vacillate between California Country and Liverpudlian Indie Pop. At the heart of the songs is love. There are lines about finding God and then wondering which God was found.
When Future Lives delves into gospel on songs like “Continental Drift Divide,” Hanick opines over of finely spun hymnal harmonies, “You must be a sign from God/And you could still be a vision of Vishnu or ‘The Eye’/And you’re by my side.”
Fourteen people played in Mansions, but the heart of Future Lives is six major dude(tte)s. Hanick sings, plays guitars and orchestrates what Flagpole Magazine calls “a veritable supergroup.” Ex­Drive By Trucker John Neff bends his pedal steel lines like sine waves etching hummable tunes into the brain. Memphis­bred Sarah Robbins stax layers of rich, crystal­clear vocal harmonies that would sound at home on a Staple Singers record. In addition to arranging the vocals with Smile­esque wonder, Sarah’s big bro Nick Robbins (Velveteen Pink) brings musical inventiveness to his complex, but tasteful, drum parts. Patrick Burke (ex­Giving Tree Band), whose Lynchian flow and precision on bass buoys the jams, isn’t shy about picking out a lead guitar part that David Crosby would twirl his moustache to.
Cameron Steuart’s string parts are as cinematic as they are down­home; as much canvas as they are ether. The arrangements are dense, but the expert mixing ears and of John Keane (R.E.M., Vic Chesnutt, 10,000 Maniacs) ensure that every part breathes.
Pitchfork said a listen to King of Prussia "will work as well as sticking your head in a lightbox to up your serotonin production on a grey, snowy day" and Magnet Magazine called the band's debut "one of the better records released this year." In addition to receiving a lot of airplay on college radio stations around the country, King of Prussia has also been reviewed/featured on NPR and Daytrotter, in A/V Club, My Old Kentucky Blog, Under the Radar, Paste Magazine, Pop Matters, Spinner, All Music Guide, Consequence of Sound and many other outlets. Now, it's time for something new.
The High Beams
The High Beams
Highbeams are a trio of brothers that play emotive, high energy Folk Rock. Since their first show on New Years Eve 2012, the band has captured audiences all over the Southeast with their warm, personable stage presence and rich three-part harmonies. Highbeams have released two full length albums and have played alongside national acts such as Vertical Horizon, Chase Bryant, Col Bruce Hampton, and the Grammy nominated duo, Brothers Osborne. Today the band continues touring behind their latest release, You Are My Home, and making the most of every opportunity to share their dream with the world.

Highbeams are Adam Pendlington, Ian Pendlington, and Stephen Quinn.
Venue Information:
The Evening Muse
3227 N. Davidson St.
Charlotte, NC
http://www.eveningmuse.com/